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Working Endless Hours Does Not Make You a Hero

Working endless hours may be nothing more than a waste of time. The BYOD and Cloud phenomenons have blurred the line between work and home with the goal of greater productivity. However, data from OECD and the Economist say just the opposite. Entrepreneur reports that Germany has the shortest work week, with employees averaging 35

WWW is 25 Years Old

The world wide web turned 25 this year.  The 1989 proposal from Sir Tim Berners-Lee for an “information management” system became the foundation for the World Wide Web. Professor Berners-Lee’s proposal has grown to a world-wide phenomenon  In honor of the milestone,the Business Insider provided some insight into how the Internet has grown through the years.

Tablet Trouble

There has been a shocking long-term trend in Apple (AAPL) iPad sales. Despite the much bally hoed launch of the new iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3, sales of Apple’s iPad has sunk to its lowest level since the 2011 introduction of the iDevice.This chart from the Business Insider shows the decline of iPad sales.

Veterans Day

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Email Etiquette is Good For You

Who remembers when email was a new and exciting technology that the intertubes brought us? Did AOL’s You’ve Got Mail! Mae you giddy? They made a whole chick-flick about it starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan. I am pretty sure that thrill has worn-off by now. According to  marketing researchers the Radicati Group predicts that

Working Endless Hours Does Not Make You a Hero

Working endless hours may be nothing more than a waste of time. The BYOD and Cloud phenomenons have blurred the line between work and home with the goal of greater productivity. However, data from OECD and the Economist say just the opposite. Entrepreneur reports that Germany has the shortest work week, with employees averaging 35 hours a week at the office, but it also the most productive nation in the world.

According to the cloud-based software company PGi which created this infographic, the marginal benefit of each hour worked on a country’s gross domestic product declines pretty steadily as the number of hours increase.

How many hours a week do you work?

Winding Down the Work Week

 

 

Ralph Bach has been in IT for fifteen years and has blogged from his Bach Seat about IT, careers and anything else that catches his attention since 2005. You can follow me at Facebook and Twitter. Email the Bach Seat here.

WWW is 25 Years Old

The world wide web turned 25 this year.  The 1989 proposal from Sir Tim Berners-Lee for an “information management” system became the foundation for the World Wide Web. Professor Berners-Lee’s proposal has grown to a world-wide phenomenon  In honor of the milestone,the Business Insider provided some insight into how the Internet has grown through the years. Statista made this chart for them using data from Pew. And here is the first US website.

Rapid Rise of the Internet

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Despite republican political posturing and corporate greed the intertubes is 25 years old. It needs our help to keep the internet open for the next 25 years.

 

Ralph Bach has been in IT for fifteen years and has blogged from his Bach Seat about IT, careers and anything else that catches his attention since 2005. You can follow me at Facebook and Twitter. Email the Bach Seat here.

Tablet Trouble

Tablet TroubleThere has been a shocking long-term trend in Apple (AAPL) iPad sales. Despite the much bally hoed launch of the new iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3, sales of Apple’s iPad has sunk to its lowest level since the 2011 introduction of the iDevice.This chart from the Business Insider shows the decline of iPad sales.

Apple iPad revenueApple CEO Tim Cook was unfazed about the iPad’s plunging sales. During Apple’s latest earnings call Apple’s Cook said, “I’m very bullish on where we can take iPad over time.”

Despite CEO Cook’s optimism, research from Kantar Worldpanel Comtech is not so sure. In a recent analysis of the tablet market, they found that consumers aren’t convinced that they need the latest iPad or any tablet for that matter.

Their conclusion is based on research which found:

  • A majority of non-tablet owners in the U.S. said they would not buy a tablet in the next 12 months.
  • Of those who will not buy a tablet, 72 percent said that their PC or laptop was “good enough” as the reason why they are not buying a tablet in the next year.
  • Tablets are not seen as an alternative to smartphones.

Carolina Milanesi, chief of research and head of U.S. business at Kantar Worldpanel laid out four reasons why tablets sales are not growing at the rate many had expected.

  1. Replacement cycles are longer for tablets than smartphones. Ms. Milanesi explains,”Software upgrades help refresh the devices, and carriers do not provide incentives/subsidies to encourage replacements every two years, as they do with smartphones.”
  2. Tablets are not as personal as smartphones. “While there is no question that tablets are more personal than PCs, if less personal than smartphones, they still land in between the two,” the Kantar chief of research says.
  3. Tablet owners hang on to their old tablet when they get a new one, while smartphone users tend to turn in their old smartphone when they upgrade to a newer one according toKantar Worldpanel data:
    • 36% of current tablet owners plan to keep their tablets even after upgrading to a new one,
    • 18% plan to past their old ones on to a friend or relative, according to Kantar Worldpanel data.
  4. Finally, the value proposition of tablets remains weak. They report that only 3% of non-tablet owners in the U.S. said they will definitely buy a tablet in the next 12 months.

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I thought that tablets  were  going to take over the world.

So what is the use case for tablets? If the Apple fanboyz and gurls aren’t buying new iPads why should anyone else?

 

Ralph Bach has been in IT for fifteen years and has blogged from his Bach Seat about IT, careers and anything else that catches his attention since 2005. You can follow me at Facebook and Twitter. Email the Bach Seat here.

Veterans Day

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Veterans Day

Email Etiquette is Good For You

Email Etiquette is Good For YouWho remembers when email was a new and exciting technology that the intertubes brought us? Did AOL’s You’ve Got Mail! Mae you giddy? They made a whole chick-flick about it starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan. I am pretty sure that thrill has worn-off by now. According to  marketing researchers the Radicati Group predicts that by 2015 the average email user will send or receive 125 emails a day many of which are loaded with threats as I have pointed out here again and again. The ubiquity of email has caused some users to take email for granted and let their guard down.

Email overloadRelaxed vigilance has led to some high-profile incidents where sensitive business information was exposed via email. While it is may be bad for the firm, it could cost you your job. Here are some tips which will make your emails more effective and more secure:

· Treat emails like business letters. It’s better to be more formal than too casual when you want to make a good impression. For example, use a person’s surname until they respond by signing their email with their first name. Never write anything in an email message that you wouldn’t want both your boss and your mom to read!

· Company email is never private. If you want to send someone confidential or time-sensitive information, use the phone or meet in person. Emails can be duplicated, forwarded, and printed; anything unfortunate you write could come back to haunt you or your employer.

· Be cautious about the “reply all” feature. If you receive an email that was sent to a multitude of people, including yourself, reply only to those who need a response. Hit “reply all” only if it is crucial that every person on the distribution list see your response. In many cases, the sender is the only person who requires a response. Misuse of “reply all” is a key way in which sensitive business data slips outside the network.

· Take care with attachments. Never open attachments from unknown sources. And before sending attachments yourself, find out if the recipient wants them. Bogus attachments remain one of the most popular ways for cyber-attackers to gain a foothold in business networks, and it’s very easy for hackers to imitate legitimate email addresses.

This infographic includes some pretty amazing stats about email. Did you know?

  • The average user creates 5,000 email attachments every year?
  • There are 6 copies of each attachment made?
  • The government reads over 250 million emails annually?

Thanks why email etiquette is important.

Ralph Bach has been in IT for fifteen years and has blogged from his Bach Seat about IT, careers and anything else that catches his attention since 2005. You can follow me at Facebook and Twitter. Email the Bach Seat here.